COPYRIGHT © 

COPYRIGHT PROTECTS YOU AGAINST COPYING BY OTHERS WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE CREATION OF YOUR OWN INTELLECT AND MENTAL EFFORT

COPYRIGHT EXTENDS TO WRITTEN WORKS, ARTISTIC CREATIONS, MOVIES, TELEVISION AND RADIO RECORDINGS, MUSICAL SCORES, LYRICS, RECORDINGS, ARRANGEMENTS AND PERFORMANCES,  ENGINEERING DRAWINGS, PREPARATORY DRAWINGS, INTERNET PUBLICATIONS, SOFTWARE CODE AND WHOLE HOST OF OTHER THINGS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION  

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Except in a very few countries, copyright does not require registration. Where it is required, we can arrange for registration of your copyright. Copyright is an IP right which "springs into existence" as the copyright work is created. The work copyright must be made concrete in some form, so that the possibility of copying exists.  Books, recordings, moldings, statues  and images on paper are just a few examples of how a copyright work can be made concrete. Software code is now also considered copyright. Copyright prohibits copying of the copyright work by others without permission. It does not prevent another author creating an identical or similar work to the copyright work if the other author did so without copying your work in any way. This is often used as a defense in copyright cases.

Copyright covers a whole host of different types of works, and includes, to name but a very few, engineering drawings, sound recordings, photographs, paintings, cinema and television recordings, buildings, maps, books, music and lyrics, plans for TV shows, lists and computer software. The list is almost endless.

Copyright generally lasts from the date of creation to the end of 70 years after the death of the final author. There are exceptions. Copyright provides two rights. The first is an economic right, which is the right to exploit the work . The economic right in a copyright work can be bought and sold. The second is the moral right. The moral right is the right to protect the integrity of the work and for each author to be named. The moral right in a copyright work can never be sold and always rests with the author or authors.

It is up to the author or owner of a copyright to keep track of where and to whom copies of the work have been made available so that, if a dispute arises, the owner can demonstrate that the alleged copier had the opportunity to copy the original work. This involves, for example, writing and keeping a complete trail of copies of letters and emails. Another idea is to mail one or more copies of the original work as registered mail back to yourself as soon after the creation of the work as is reasonable. The registered mail is not opened until a court might requires proof of the earliest date you created the copyright work and what exactly that copyright work was. It also pays to date and indicate the place of creation of any new copyright work. You might even go so far as to sign and date the original copyright work, indicate its place of origin, and have a witness to your signature sign after you. It all depends how important the copyright  work is to you.

Copyright covers a very  wide field, and there are many exceptions to the brief summary given here. The United Kingdom Intellectual Property Office provides an excellent description of UK copyright which will fill in any gaps.

The Berne Convention provides that a copyright work, created in one country, automatically enjoys the same rights under the copyright law of another country as if the work were created in the another country on the same date it was created in the first country. Nearly all countries have now signed up to the Berne Convention. This means that nearly all works are copyright throughout most of the world.

TELL US YOUR COPYTRIGHT NEEDS. WE WILL TELL YOU HOW WE CAN HELP